Dealing with Doubt

Dealing with Doubt

Webster defines doubt as “a condition of uncertainty.” It’s part of how we analyze and process thoughts, facts, and events. Unbelief is a different animal. Unbelief is defined as an absence of belief—the very opposite of faith. The enemy’s goal is to move us from doubt to unbelief. His method? Stir up uncertainty about what God says and His intentions toward us. Check out Genesis 3:1-5:

Now the serpent was more crafty than any of the wild animals the LORD God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God really say, ‘You must not eat from any tree in the garden’?”

The woman said to the serpent, “We may eat fruit from the trees in the garden, but God did say, ‘You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it, or you will die.’”

You will not surely die,” the serpent said to the woman. “For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”

Watch how the enemy frames his words as he casts doubt on God’s instructions and on God’s intentions for man.

Verse 1: Did God really say? Any tree?

Verse 3: Surely not. . . . God knows …..

As the enemy implies God is withholding something, Eve loses sight of all God has already given her. She begins to question His goodness.

Satan tried this method on Jesus too. Read the account of Jesus’ temptation (Matthew 4:3-10), we see the word “If” several times. We also see another offer of something “withheld.” However, Jesus knows the Father far better than Eve did and knows there is no reason to doubt His goodness or His instructions. Sorry, Satan.

Doubts are far from fatal. It’s what we do with the doubt that takes us down one of two paths.

Doubt, taken to God, leads to faith.

Doubt, apart from God, ends in unbelief.

And unbelief is a big deal.

When we bring our doubt to God, He helps us work through it. Consider Peter when he walked on the water to Jesus (Matthew 14:28-32). After Jesus caught the sinking Peter, Peter walked back to the boat. Think about it.

Or in John 20:27-28 when Jesus confronts Thomas after the resurrection.

Or my favorite, in Mark 9:20-24, when a man brings his son to Jesus:

“So they brought him [the boy]. When the spirit saw Jesus, it immediately threw the boy into a convulsion. He fell to the ground and rolled around, foaming at the mouth.

Jesus asked the boy’s father, “How long has he been like this?”

“From childhood,” he answered. “It has often thrown him into the fire or water to kill him. But if you can do anything, take pity on us and help us.”

“ ‘If you can’?” said Jesus. “Everything is possible for him who believes.”

Immediately the boy’s father exclaimed, “I do believe; help me overcome my unbelief!”

That day, the boy was healed.

What a contrast to Eve’s unbelief in Genesis 3:6, “When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye, and was desirable for gaining wisdom, she took some and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, who was with her and he ate it.”

Her unbelief touches us today.

Unbelief leads to sin—or worse, eternal separation from God.

Bring your doubts to God. Run them through the filter of His Word. Ask God to strengthen your faith as you work through your questions together.

God is faithful.

No doubt about it.

Questions:

What are some doubts you’ve had about God?

How did those doubts affect your choices?

How did you handle those doubts?

How would you counsel someone with doubt?

Specifically, how will you counsel your kids when they express doubt?

Tweetables:

Webster defines doubt as “a condition of uncertainty.” Click to tweet.

Unbelief is a different animal, an absence of belief—the very opposite of faith. Click to tweet.

The enemy’s goal is to bring us from doubt to unbelief. Click to tweet.

Doubt, taken to God, leads to faith. Click to tweet.

Doubt, apart from God, ends in unbelief. And unbelief is a big deal. Click to tweet.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *